Friday Newsletter, January 31

Piggly, Cows and Armadillos, Oh News!

Be Seen in The East Nashvillian!
We’re hard at work on the next issue of The East Nashvillian and now is the time to get your ad into the pages. Contact sales@theeasnashvillian.com now to place your ad!

And don’t forget to grab your copy of our current issue. It features Nashville R&B Music Masterminds Louis York; American roots music maestros the Wood Brothers; activist Jim Gregory’s plan for a “shadier” Nashville, and our exclusive profiles of the 2019 East Nashvillians of the Year — along with much more! Grab your copy from the usual locations around town or check out the online version right now!

Presenting the East Nashvillians of the Year!
If you’ve seen our January-February issue you already know the story of the East Nashvillians of the Year — Delgado Guitars owner Manuel Delgado and neighborhood activist Marilyn Greer. But here’s your chance to meet them in person and mingle with your fellow East Nashvillians at the Historic East Nashville Merchants Association February Mixer!

The HENMA mixer and official East Nashvillian of the Year awards ceremony will be
held at Vandyke Bed & Beverage, 105 S. 11th St., on Tuesday, Feb. 4, 5-7 p.m. Come mix and mingle with East Side business owners and meet HENMA’s new board members as they look forward to another exciting year on the East Side!

Former Piggly Wiggly Finds New Life
The former Piggly Wiggly grocery store at 917 Dickerson Pike is slated to undergo a major transformation according to a story in Nashville Post. The 13,600-square-foot building is currently owned by Danielle Rice who is seeking 3-5 restaurant or retail tenants for the building with plans to make it anchor business in the rejuvenation of the Dickerson Pike corridor.

The building, which features a vaulted barrel ceiling, was built in 1946 by Nashville real estate developer Bertie C. Webb for the Grand Central Food Market. The Dickerson Pike location was one of the flagship outlets of a chain of grocery stores owned by Webb and his son James, and featured Nashville’s first self-serve meat department.

Advertisement

Armadillos on Riverside
If you’re driving down Riverside and think you see a line of armadillos, your eyes are not fooling you. They’re not nine-banded migrants from the Lone Star State, but new, soft plastic roadway dividers that Metro has installed in an effort to protect cyclists.

Made from recycled plastic and already a success story in several European cities, the traffic dividers are a test project by Metro Nashville Public Works. The goal is to keep motor vehicles out of designated bicycle lanes and reduce injury accidents among cyclists.  If the current test program is deemed a success expect to see more of the hump-backed traffic dividers on Nashville roadways.

Riverside Drive Veterans Memorial Demolished
Speaking of traffic accidents on Riverside Drive, the Veterans Memorial on Riverside at Golf Street was severely damaged by a speeding driver who crashed head on into the nearly 90-year-old monument in the early morning hours of Saturday, Jan. 25.

Initially dedicated in 1933 to honor neighborhood veterans of the First World War, the monument was refurbished and rededicated in 1959 to include World War II and Korean War veterans. Neighborhood activist and founder of Friends of Riverside Drive (a 501(c)3 non-profit), Anthony Viglietti has a set up a fund to restore the monument.  Donations may be mailed to Friends of Riverside Drive, 1306 Haysboro Ave., Nashville, TN 37216-1410. For more information and updates visit the Friends of Riverside Drive Facebook page.

CowTalks at The Wild Cow
East Side vegan eatery The Wild Cow (1100 Fatherland St., Suite 104) is closed on Tuesdays, but starting this week there will be talk in corral as The Wild Cow kicks off a series of monthly talks/workshops with interesting and informative speakers.

On Tuesday, Feb. 4, Ramona Reid from Nashville Center for Alternative Healing and the host of radio show Holistic Revolution (as heard on WXNA 101.5 FM on Tuesdays at 2 p.m.) will give a class on Enneagram personality testing, a personality typing system incorporating traditional wisdom with modern psychology.

The talk starts at 6 p.m. The kitchen will be closed, but the bar will open 5:30.  There is no admission fee, but donations for the speaker are encouraged. For more information, visit The Wild Cow event page.

Weekend Show Round-Up
Some great shows this week to satisfy your taste for live music!

Tonight, Friday, Jan. 31, “Girl Power Bluegrass Band,” the Mama Said String  Band will be making their Dee’s Country Cocktail Lounge debut. This Kentucky quintet (which includes one dude) has been stirring up the buzz in their home state and are fresh from a win for “Album of the Year” at the Lexington, Kentucky Music Awards. The show starts at 8 p.m. at  102 E. Palestine Ave. in Madison. For more info, drop by the Facebook event page.

On Saturday, Feb. 1 an incredible line-up of downhome and Down Under talent are uniting for Come Together: An Australian Brushfire Fundraiser at the Mercy Lounge (1 Cannery Row). For more info on the show see our separate post and learn how you can help with the relief efforts for Australia’s devastating brushfires. For tickets, visit the event page.

Wednesday, Feb. 5, British punks The Adicts will be rolling into The Basement East (917 Woodland St.). Since the 1981 release of their debut album, Songs of Praise, they have been mixing punk fury with catchy melodies and large helpings of humor, fun, and theatricality — elements missing from many of their second-wave punk contemporaries. Don’t miss this rare Nashville appearance. For more info and tickets, hit the Facebook event page.

Quick Bits

  • A Metro permit valued at $50,000 has been issued for Sean Brock’s Joyland restaurant Nashville Business Journal Located at 901 Woodland St., the former home of Stay Golden restaurant, Joyland is scheduled to open in March.
  • The commercial property at 921 Main St., former home to AlphaGraphics printing, has listed for sale for $3.25 million, according to a report in Nashville Post. Built in 1965, the building offers about 9,900 square feet of business space.